Campfire Porridge

 

Camping in the cooler months of the year can be challenging. However as with all adventures, if your day starts with the best breakfast possible all vibes gain a positive bias. We discovered campfire porridge on our last camping trip to the Snowy Mountains and whilst it was not so snowy, the mornings were crispy cold. The discovery that no milk was needed added to this porridge revelation, as the overnight soaking and slower, real cooking of porridge (ie. no microwave) broke down the starch from the oats, resulting in a creamy lush bowl of porridge guaranteed to warm any frosty mood. 

 

Recipe

Ingredients

For two people

  • 1/2 cup steel cut oats
  • 1/2 cup rolled oats
  • 2 small bananas chopped
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 1/2 cups of water
  • Handful of walnuts - broken up
  • Handful of toasted coconut chips 
  • Honey

 

Method

  1. Stir and soak the oats, chia seeds and cinnamon with 1 cup of water in a covered bowl. We found it was ok to leave this unrefrigerated overnight in the cool weather. 
  2. The next morning over a campfire or stove add 1/2 cup water to cover the porridge mixture and cook in a suitable pot until water is absorbed - you can vary the amounts of water you add depending on how thick or runny you like your porridge
  3. Continuously stir the porridge so it does not stick to the bottom of the pot
  4. When cooked to your liking, divide the porridge up into two bowls, add the chopped bananas, walnuts and toasted coconut chips on top
  5. Drizzle honey all over
  6. Enjoy a warming bowl of breakfast and watching nature awaken around you

 

magnolia_mountain_campside_porridge_IV.jpg

 

 

Notes

  • To save on the fuss of packing multiple jars and containers, mix up the quantities of oats, chia and cinnamon in one container and the coconut chips and walnuts in another before you leave on your trip
  • Be sure to soak the pot straight after serving up breakfast to avoid dried porridge washing-up angst
  • Confused about steel-cut, un-stabilised, rolled and quick oats? Basically the difference lies in the processing of the oats and their storage longevity. Steel cut oats are the whole oat with the outer husk removed and are chopped into 2-4 pieces (they have a chewy texture when cooked as porridge). Un-stabilised oats are the same except instead of being chopped, the oats are rolled flat. Stabilised oats (which are the majority of oats sold, unless they specify "un-stabilised") are oats that have been rolled and steamed to increase their shelf-life and decrease their cooking time. Quick oats are these same stabilised oats that have been rolled, steamed but have been chopped up further to make the speediest and smoothest textured porridge possible.